This Week in Restoring Family Links: 1/30/17-2/1/17

This Week in Restoring Family Links: 1/30/17-2/1/17

Malaysia: The lunar new year in Malaysia will be facing disruption as floods affect as many as 15,000 people. Hamilah Binta Isa from the village of Buloh Kasap said “it has been four days since the flood waters forced us to evacuate and I still can’t get to my house.” The Malaysian Red Crescent society has been having its staff and volunteers provide relief to those affected. Basic necessities have been distributed as well as support in rescue activities. There has also been a need for psychological support following the traumatic effects of the flooding.

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Human+Kind:Salvador's Story

Human+Kind:Salvador's Story

Salvador — I was deported 8 years ago. I would sing in the United States. I was young, I had a good voice. There, I would sing for pleasure. In Tijuana, I sing because I need to make a living. I live well. I rent a small apartment. I have a stove, food, a place to sit and rest a bit. I have a small living room where I can watch TV.

I don’t ask for money. I give what I can [through my music] and people pay what they can give me. Thank God and to the people who pass by. 

I’m happy.

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This Week in Restoring Family Links: 1/27/16

This Week in Restoring Family Links: 1/27/16

New Zealand: In 2016 the Kaikoura Earthquake struck the South Island of New Zealand. The earthquake was found to have a magnitude of 7.8 and caused significant damage ranging from sediment-clogged rivers as well as destroyed houses, landslides, and destructed farms. This natural disaster not only caused great physical damage, but financial damage as well. Insurers are expected to have to pay an estimated $41.69 million to cover the damages.

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Human+Kind: Carlos's Story

CARLOS. PHOTO CREDIT: CARLOS RODRIGUEZ, RED CROSS VOLUNTEER Migration affects the lives of millions across the United States, the Americas, and globally. The Human+Kind project seeks to highlight the stories of migrants in the US-Mexico borderlands and the work of humanitarian organizations to support them, including the work of the Red Cross. For more from this project, please click here.

CARLOS. PHOTO CREDIT: CARLOS RODRIGUEZ, RED CROSS VOLUNTEER

Migration affects the lives of millions across the United States, the Americas, and globally. The Human+Kind project seeks to highlight the stories of migrants in the US-Mexico borderlands and the work of humanitarian organizations to support them, including the work of the Red Cross. For more from this project, please click here.

Carlos — I was deported near Nogales, Arizona. I was working in a restaurant and I got picked up. My idea was to earn a little money in Tijuana and then cross back to the United States. I’ve been here 5 years. I earn a living by washing car windows [as they wait at a red light]. It’s not easy to earn a living here. Washing windows is better than the turning to crime.

I pay three dollars a night to sleep in a shelter, just so that I don’t have to sleep in the street. I make six or seven dollars a day washing windows. They say it’s a crime to sleep in the street. There was a night when it hailed, and it got really cold. When morning came, my bones were frozen, so I had to start a fire to get warm. That night, three people that slept nearby never woke up. 

I left twin daughters in the United States. There’s nothing I can do. I’ve tried to cross but the migra [border patrol] has been tough. The fog’s been rolling in these days — God willing it will be possible to cross. I don’t do it for myself but for my kids. They’re growing up, they’re three years old now, and it’s important that they have a father.

Something is going to happen. I pray to God every day for my girls. I haven’t been able to call them. I lost their number about four months ago. It’s depressing but here we are.

Life is different here. I used to take warm showers, sleep in my own bed, and change my clothes daily. I can’t do that now.