In Nigeria, fear, anxiety and a long journey home

In Nigeria, fear, anxiety and a long journey home

Fear and anxiety. They are emotions that a teenager, a blind man and two brothers in Nigeria had in common after outbreaks of violence forced them to flee so quickly they lost track of their family. The four share something else in common: A happy ending.

Thirteen-year-old Abba was playing with friends when volleys of gunfire sent the town of Mubi into panic one afternoon in 2014. Abba ran into nearby mountains. Now separated from his family, the teen travelled nearly 200 kilometers north -- mostly on foot – to the city of Maiduguri. Months passed as he settled into the routine of life in a camp for displaced people. Then one day he met with an International Committee of the Red Cross team that specializes in putting separated families back together again.

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A Mother's Love is Timeless

A Mother's Love is Timeless

In early March 2017, Hawa Mailon met with Elissa Maish, the Red Cross Restoring Family Links Caseworker in Tucson, Arizona.  Hawa’s story involved a first-hand account of most horrific epidemic of the decade and included an ending that no one really anticipated.  

Hawa was born and grew up in Guinea Conakry on the west coast of Africa.  She married and had two sons, Oumar and Mohammed.  For several years after the death of her husband in 2005, Hawa was able to keep her small family together. Eviction from their apartment forced them to split up. Each lived with different friends in various locations. They eventually lost touch with each other. Oumar was only 7 years old.    In 2016, Hawa gained refugee status and arrived in Tucson. She never stopped thinking and worrying about her sons.  In March 2017, at an informal get-together in Tucson, she lamented the loss of her sons to a young man from Guinea.  She was about to experience the serendipity of receiving information that might lead to her son. 

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From Gaza to Paris to be reunited after three years

From Gaza to Paris to be reunited after three years

A few weeks ago, Laila, a 7-year old girl, began a trip that she will remember for her entire life - the one that took her from Gaza to Paris to be reunited with her family.

Her journey involved a whirlwind of emotions: from the sadness of leaving behind her grandmother, uncles and extended family in Gaza, the fatigue of traveling more than 24 hours crossing several countries, to the sheer joy of hugging her parents and two sisters again in Paris after three years apart.

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Restoring Family Links: Connecting Susan Stevens

Restoring Family Links: Connecting Susan Stevens

Hugh and Susan Stevens are on a mission to preserve part of their family history. A few years ago, the couple visited the Jewish Museum in Berlin and after reading about the people and families impacted, she felt it was time to dig further into her own untold family story.

While cleaning out some items that belonged to her late aunt, Vera Rosenthal, Susan stumbled upon two well-preserved typed letters emblazoned with the American Red Cross logo.

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A Message of Hope for Rose

A Message of Hope for Rose

Rose Gonsa Minga and her family fled war-torn Congo seeking a better life.  Instead, they were unexpectedly torn apart.

The family left the DRC capital of Kinshasa on a grueling journey of more than 1,000 miles. Rose was pregnant for most of the journey. Once arrived in the Ugandan capital of Kampala, Rose was hospitalized due to complications, remaining there for six months. Unable to care for her two younger children, they stayed with friends.  Her eldest daughter had remained back in the DRC awaiting instructions to rejoin the rest of the family.

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